Southern bolthole on rugged coast one of five TIDA best homes

A small holiday home on New Zealand’s rugged southern coast has caught the eye of the judges this year Trends International Design Awards (TIDA).

Designed by Stacey Farrell of Stacey Farrell Architect, the project won the 2022 TIDA New Zealand Architect New Home of the Year award.

The low, grounded house is embedded into the landscape, hunkering down from the harsh coastal weather, while materials and colors are deliberately pared back so they don’t compete with the natural environment.

The house hunkers down into the rugged landscape.

BEN RUFFELL

The house hunkers down into the rugged landscape.

The TIDA judges said the discrete hideaway retreat illustrated how thoughtful design and architecture can make the most of a remote site, and produce a very distinctive home – on a very small budget.

Not only designed to be sustainable, with a small environmental impact, the house is also relocatable should sea levels rise. It “wraps” around a large windswept native beech tree, and opens up to reveal views across dunes, the ocean and snow-capped mountains.

The interior of the house has a black and brown palette to match the exterior.

BEN RUFFELL

The interior of the house has a black and brown palette to match the exterior.

Ply linings are another link with the natural landscape.

BEN RUFFELL

Ply linings are another link with the natural landscape.

The interior is oriented to make the most of the sun, views and solar gain, with a reduced material palette of two internal linings to match the two external claddings.

TIDA judging panel chairman Paul Taylor says the easing of post-Covid difficulties for the construction industry resulted in a large number of entries into this year’s awards.

He says this year’s award winners show how good designers take challenges and work through solutions that turn a negative into a positive.

“On one level, this may mean working within a restrictive budget. Or the site itself may have challenging aspects – such as a steep slope or awkward orientation or difficult dimensions.”

Other winners are as follows:

2022 TIDA New Zealand Renovation of the Year: Brendon Monk of Modo Architects

Brendon Monk of Modo Architects won the 2022 TIDA New Zealand Renovation of the Year award with this large addition to a house on a Marlborough vineyard.

SIMON DEVITT

Brendon Monk of Modo Architects won the 2022 TIDA New Zealand Renovation of the Year award with this large addition to a house on a Marlborough vineyard.

After 12 years of living in this house on a Marlborough vineyard, the owners called on the home’s original architect to design extra living and entertaining spaces, plus a large covered outdoor living area.

At the same time, they wanted to extend the landscaping design, including the regeneration of flora around the water’s edge.

Monk designed a sheltered multipurpose addition, using full-height sliding doors and a retractable roof. The outdoor living area also acts as a large shade canopy for the dining room in summer, and creates a sun trap for winter.

The landscape was also transformed as part of the overall project.

SIMON DEVITT

The landscape was also transformed as part of the overall project.

The TIDA judges were impressed with how the addition has created a flexible extension of the entire central living pavilion, providing extra living room space, as well as the large outdoor room.

2022 TIDA New Zealand Designer New Home of the Year: Garry Mayne, Studio 4 Architects

This new family home in a residential area with a rural outlook needed to be a modern entertainer’s home.

The design responds to provide the owners with a private oasis, that is open to the sun, and surrounding environment.

This new home by Garry Mayne of Studio 4 Architects is the 2022 TIDA New Zealand Designer New Home of the Year.

DENNIS RADERMACHER

This new home by Garry Mayne of Studio 4 Architects is the 2022 TIDA New Zealand Designer New Home of the Year.

The living area opens out to a sheltered patio with overhead louvres.

DENNIS RADERMACHER

The living area opens out to a sheltered patio with overhead louvres.

Externally, the house creates a sense of arrival as you approach. The understated material palette of plaster and locally sourced Timaru stone continues from the exterior to the interior and forms an immediate connection with the landscape.

Inside, the double-height living area features a raking ceiling with high windows that set up a play of light and shadow across the interior throughout the day.

TIDA judges described this modern family home as “an outstanding example of how considered architecture can enhance the lifestyle of a growing family, providing an environment that can be enjoyed all year-round”.

2022 TIDA New Zealand Group Home Builder of the Year: David Reid Homes Waitaki/South Canterbury

This luxury 380m² home consists of two pavilions angled into a V, with the entrance positioned at the apex. The wings – one clad in weathered steel and the other in plaster – open out to take in rural vistas and are connected with extensive decking.

David Reid Homes Waitaki/South Canterbury was the 2022 TIDA New Zealand Group Home Builder of the Year with this V-shaped house.

Wayne Hutchinson

David Reid Homes Waitaki/South Canterbury was the 2022 TIDA New Zealand Group Home Builder of the Year with this V-shaped house.

The steel-clad pavilion is dedicated to the kitchen, and open-plan living and dining, with a mezzanine above the kitchen providing another lounge and an office.

Black steel framing, pitched paneled ceilings and polished concrete are offset by sage green walls, while light floods in through sliders, skylights, floor-to-ceiling and clerestory windows. The second wing accommodates bedrooms.

The TIDA judges noted that it was not just the overall form of the home and its crisply modern interior that immediately impressed, but also the high level of detailing that can be seen throughout.

Black steel framing, pitched paneled ceilings and polished concrete are offset by sage green walls.

Wayne Hutchinson

Black steel framing, pitched paneled ceilings and polished concrete are offset by sage green walls.

2022 TIDA New Zealand Interior Design of the Year: Jennie Dunlop, Dunlop Design

This was the second time the interior designer was called to work on this home. The first time, 20 years ago, was to update a 1980s interior that had been installed in the 1912 Edwardian home.

Now the owners are empty-nesters with grandchildren. They wanted the ground floor completely upgraded again to suit their new lifestyle.

Existing glossy marble floor tiles throughout were removed and replaced with beautiful custom, wide-board oak flooring, complete with underfloor ducted heating. And the under-utilized formal dining room has been transformed into a light modern dining space for family gatherings. Meanwhile, the family seating area has doubled in size, and now accommodates two new sofas and armchairs.

Interior designer Jennie Dunlop designed this interior to win the 2022 TIDA New Zealand Interior Design of the Year.  This is the family room.

Jamie Cobel

Interior designer Jennie Dunlop designed this interior to win the 2022 TIDA New Zealand Interior Design of the Year. This is the family room.

It was the second time Jennie Dunlop has been called in to upgrade the interior of the Edwardian house - the first time was 20 years ago.

Jamie Cobel

It was the second time Jennie Dunlop has been called in to upgrade the interior of the Edwardian house – the first time was 20 years ago.

Solid bifold doors between the family and living rooms were replaced with a custom designed iron and glass wall.

The kitchen was also refreshed with new surfaces, and a large skylight was removed to enable three Falling Leaf pendants to be positioned above the island.

The TIDA judges noted how this second interior revamp has skillfully created a more contemporary style with cleaner lines, while maintaining the integrity of the home’s classic Edwardian architectural elements.

Stuff

Here are the best new houses, renovation and interior in New Zealand for 2021, as judged by the TIDA panel. (Video first screened November 2021)

Leave a Comment